Wishlist


0 Item
View All

Bag


Total
$0.00
Checkout
 

People

People slider template
  • We present Jean Paul Gaultier
    Vault 1, a collection of 50
    iconic vintage pieces from the
    designer’s defining era, exclusive
    to House of Liza and Farfetch


Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Jean Paul Gaultier Vault

From House of Liza

Anything Goes

Words by Hollie Moat; Photography by Meinke Klein; styling by Anna Trevelyan; hair by Soichi; make up by Isamaya Ffrench; nails by Ami Streets; Model: Flo Dron at Select


In the vast landscape of fashion, few things are truly iconic. But Jean Paul Gaultier Vault 1, a collection of 50 unworn pieces dating between 1984 and 1994, is chock-full of items that are just that.

The collection is exclusive to House Of Liza, a gem of a store tucked away in East London, and Farfetch. House of Liza is renowned for its high-fashion vintage, but Gaultier holds a special allure for the owner, Gonçalo Velosa. ‘[Jean Paul Gaultier] first came on my radar in Paris in the late Eighties. His designs dealt with issues such as equality, acceptance and our place in the world, and that really encapsulated my coming out during my late teens.’

For the uninitiated, and by now there can’t be many, Jean Paul Gaultier is the industry’s original enfant terrible, who became one of the most celebrated names in Paris fashion.

Born in 1952 in the town of Arcueil, France, he fell in love with the art of clothes-making at an early age, but never undertook any formal design training. Instead, his break came in 1970 when he was hired as an assistant by Pierre Cardin, who was impressed by the drawings Gaultier had sent him.

He launched his eponymous label in 1976 and, within a couple of years, his playfully subversive aesthetic was the talk of the town. Gonçalo explains: ‘[He was] witty, devilish, provocative. His rebellious vision of femininity and his narcissistic view of men challenged the unwritten rules that a Parisian couturier would usually employ. His importance is his transgression on the rules of taste. His anti-aesthetic stance, defining our “anything goes” epoch, became the new, eclectic good taste.’

Gaultier’s boundary-breaking career is still going strong more than four decades later; Jean Paul Gaultier Vault 1 only serves to highlight the importance of his contribution to the fashion world. 

We’ve picked out the collection’s most significant pieces, not so much clothes as sign-posts to the designer’s defining moments.

Stripes


Nautical stripes aren’t just a prominent feature in Gaultier’s collections; they’re his personal uniform. Vault 1’s red-and-white striped sleeveless top appears lifted from the designer’s own wardrobe. ‘I have a fixation with stripes,’ he once said. ‘When I was a child I used to wear striped tops, and when I was an adolescent I wore them because flea markets were in fashion and the tops were cheap. I saw the [French Navy] tops and I liked the graphic style. The uniforms are so gorgeous and can be very elegant.’

Underwear-as-outerwear


Gaultier has been a master of this look since childhood. After falling in love with a corset at an exhibition, he made a bra for his teddy bear: ‘I wanted a doll to dress up but my parents didn’t want me to so I made my first transvestite teddy bear instead.’ Corsets, which reminded him of his beloved grandmother, remained a fascination and Vault 1’s mint satin dress, with its boned, underwear aesthetic, cropped up in his Spring/Summer 1992 Elegance Contest collection.

Tattoos


Tattoos have long captivated Gaultier: he is drawn to the idea of playing with an art that is ‘looked down upon’. Among his early pieces were ‘tattoo skins’ – long-sleeved, tight-fitting stretch-nylon tops that printed with the bursting roses, pierced hearts, and tribal swirls of body art. Two of these are included in Vault 1. His tattoo collection remains one of Gaultier’s personal favourites.

Androgyny


‘Except for the codpiece and the bra, garments have never had a gender,’ Gaultier once said, a notion held up by many of his collections. There was the dress for men in Pretty Mister (Autumn/Winter 1985), which also featured a metallic sweater included in Vault 1, and in his Spring/Summer 1985 A Wardrobe For Two collection he debuted a post-macho skirt for men. The collection also included Vault 1’s black and pink tie-dyed, fringed tunic.

The cone bra


Since Madonna’s infamous 1990 Blonde Ambition tour, Gaultier has found notoriety as the man who created the cone bra. The Material Girl may have defined the look, but the Frenchman had perfected it some time earlier in an Aran knit dress with conical chest details featured in Vault 1. Gonçalo explains: ‘It’s one of Gaultier’s most important contributions to contemporary knitwear.  From the Autumn/Winter 1985 Le Charme Coincé de la Bourgeoisie collection influenced by the Fifties sweater girl, it marks the point from which we see him exploring knitwear as a reassessment of femininity.’ 

Extra-curricular activities


Other designers may have designed costumes for films, but Gaultier has actually sat on the board of the Cannes Film Festival. He also had a memorable stint presenting the British TV show Eurotrash, and released a surprisingly well-received single, How to do that, in 1989. The video features models wearing pieces from that year’s Around the World in 168 Outfits collection, notably a cut-away corset ‘cage’ top that features in Vault 1.
>
Pin It